Dachshund Mix Breeds


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35+ Dachshund Mix Dogs: Which Is the Best Wiener for You?

Doxies are playful, goofy, and ballsy. When you read our detailed Dachshund breed guide, we’re sure you’ll get how adorable they are. If all those hilarious Dachshund memes are anything to go by, these furballs are a dog owner’s dream.

You know that doggos and owners have to be perfectly matched so that both sides live happily together. For example, you don’t want to adopt a pup that needs a lot of your attention if you work 12-hour shifts.

If you would love to have a Dachs, but some of their traits don’t work for you, you may be able to find exactly what you need in one of the Dachshund mix puppers!

Here is a brief overview of all Dachshund crossbreeds and their most prominent traits. If some of them catch your eye, feel free to learn more about them in our in-depth guides to all Doxie hybrids! Let’s dig in!

Dachshund Poodle Mix: The Doodle

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  • Dachshund Poodles are super smart but also exceptionally emotionally intelligent — they’ll always be in tune with your emotions and be with you through the highs and the lows.
  • They are excellent people-dogs and relish the company of humans.
  • Doxipoos can boast about being hypoallergenic, thanks to their Poodle parent, so they are a great fit for owners with dog allergies.
  • Their luscious coat will need daily brushing, so they are not among the easiest fluffers to keep.

Chihuahua Dachshund Mix: The Chiweenie

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  • Chiweenies are not the best canines to keep around small kids — they simply lack the patience for putting up with toddlers who think a dog is a stuffed toy!
  • They are temperamental and may resist training, so you’ll likely need expert help with that.
  • One of their best characteristics is that they are super adaptable and can live in even the smallest apartments.
  • They are adorable and easy to love — who could resist their petite frame and their gentle and cuddly personality?

German Shepherd Dachshund Mix: The Doxie Shep

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  • Since German Shepherd Dachshunds will likely be bigger than your regular Doxie, they’ll need enough space to move about.
  • They are particularly active, just like their German Shepherd parent, and will be happiest in a yard and with an owner who likes to spend time outdoors with their pooch.
  • Their impressive working-dog ancestry makes them terrific guard dogs.

Dachshund Terrier Mix

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  • Doxie Terriers are incredible yappers! Inexperienced owners will have a lot to learn before they tame this breed.
  • They are happiest around people and don’t do well when left home alone.
  • These tiny tricksters are super fun to be around.
  • They require minimal grooming, so they are perfectly fitted for owners with busy schedules.

Dachshund Cocker Spaniel Mix: The Docker

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  • Cocker Spaniel Dachshunds are beautiful, charismatic charmers — they are incredibly playful but may get snappy around little kids.
  • The Cocker’s long hair is prone to matting, so grooming their mixed pupperinos will require a lot of devotion on your part.
  • They are also susceptible to separation anxiety, so make sure you have the time to spend with this breed.
  • They are convenient companions for most owners because they are excellent for compact living spaces and don’t need a yard to be happy.

Dachshund Shih Tzu Mix: The Shiweenie

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  • Dachshund Shih Tzus require the diva treatment in terms of grooming, which will exert a lot of commitment and dough on your part.
  • Shih Tzus are hypoallergenic, so if you get a mixed pooch that takes after their Chinese parent, you won’t have to worry about your allergies flaring up.
  • They have love to spare — they will adore adults, kids, other dogs, and all your other pets!
  • They are prone to breathing problems due to their short snouts — that may mean anything from mild snoring to a full-blown Brachycephalic Airway Obstruction Syndrome (BAOS).

Dachshund Min Pin Mix: The Doxie Pin

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  • Min Pin Dachshund mix dogs are super clever, which means they’ll cherish mental and physical stimulation every day, especially if they live with owners who enjoy teaching them new tricks.
  • They are prone to skeletal problems typical of the parent breeds, so regular checkups are a must with this cross.
  • Min Pin Dachs can squeeze into small living spaces, so you don’t have to worry about not having a yard or a bigger place.
  • They are also ideal for new owners as grooming them is easy-peasy.

Basset Hound Dachshund Mix

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  • Basset Hound Doxies are super laid-back — they don’t require a particularly active owner and are happy living in an apartment, a house, outside…
  • If you don’t reaffirm yourself as the pack leader and an alpha dog, they will subdue you to their will — prepare for demanding training sessions with these pooches!
  • They are known to have an unpleasant smell, which is why they need frequent baths; they also shed extensively, so grooming will need your full attention every day.
  • They come from hound parents, and they bark a lot, so make sure that fits in with your surroundings and that your neighbors can live with that, too.

Great Dane Dachshund Mix: The Great Wiener

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  • The Great Dane Dachshund mix is a rarity among designer breeds, so you may need to work hard to get one of these pooches.
  • They can get rather large like their Great Dane mom, but they’ll still be happy to live in an apartment — they are quite the couch potatoes!
  • They’ll gladly babysit for you because they love kids climbing and jumping on top of them.
  • Usually, they are shorthaired, so they need minimal grooming, which is terrific news for most owners.

Cairn Terrier Dachshund Mix: The Doxie Cairn

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  • A Cairn Terrier Dachshund is one goofy furball — you’ll never be bored around one of these fluffers!
  • When they sense something they don’t like, they mean business! They will protect you and alert you of any suspicious activities by yapping your ears off.
  • They have a keen prey drive that will make them hunt any other small pets you have, so the wellbeing of your other animals cannot be guaranteed.
  • This could be the most adaptable breed out there — they can live in a house, a yard, the country, the city, and they will gladly follow you wherever you go if you need to move or travel.

Pug Dachshund Mix: The Daug

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  • Dachshund Pug is an ideal lap dog — affectionate and cuddly — and they are particularly attached to their owners.
  • Their specific build makes them prone to obesity and skeletal issues, so you’ll need to pay special attention to their diet and exercise regime.
  • In terms of grooming, you’ll have a blast keeping them neat — they are low maintenance and usually not as smelly as other dogs.

Lab Dachshund Mix: The Dachsador

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  • Dachshund Lab woofers need perseverance when potty training and housebreaking as they usually inherit the obstinance typical of their Doxie parent.
  • They are exquisite guard dogs that will give their lives to protect their human family.
  • Their most endearing trait is that they love being around children and are always in the mood to play with the little ones.
  • With this breed, you’ll get all the amazing qualities of a Lab but in a much more compact, apartment-friendly package.

Dachshund Beagle Mix: The Doxle

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  • Dachshund Beagle doggos are super cute and lovable, but they are big chewers — make sure they don’t get bored or say your fancy furniture goodbye.
  • These pooches are low-maintenance dogs, which is great news for owners on a schedule.
  • Beagles are pliable, but Doxies are unyielding — start training this mix early to hinder any potential issues with housebreaking.

Dachshund Golden Retriever Mix: The Golden Dox

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  • Golden Dox puppers are smart and reliable, which makes them obedient and easy to train.
  • Golden Retrievers are exceptional service dogs, and their crossbreeds may inherit those traits.
  • They bark loudly but not too often; when they do, it’s a resounding big-dog bark that alerts you of any activities they deem suspicious and worthy of your attention.

Shiba Inu Dachshund Mix: The Shiba Dox

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  • A Dachshund Shiba Inu mix is a resilient breed, which is generally rather healthy.
  • They will make you break a sweat day in, day out — this pooch just loves luring you outside to workout and play.
  • They are the happiest in big spacious dwellings, so if you have a tiny apartment, they are not the best fit for you.

Dachshund Corgi Mix: The Dorgi

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  • Dachshund Corgis love to run about and roam around parks or the local woods, and they need an equally active owner.
  • They are particularly prone to separation anxiety, so make sure you have enough time to devote to them.
  • Tiny fluffers as they are, they bark like giant woofers!
  • Unlike most Doxie mixed breeds, these furballs respond well to training, which is convenient for first-time dog owners.

Jack Russell Dachshund Mix: The Jackshund

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  • Jack Russell Dachshund mix dogs have a big personality that you’ll recognize as soon as you meet them — they are lively and playful but also strong-willed and persistent.
  • They love being around you and don’t do well when left alone.
  • They are excellent family additions — couples, singles, seniors, you name it, they’ll have it!

Dachshund Yorkie Mix: The Dorkie

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  • Dachshund Yorkie doggos are adaptable to all living spaces and are the perfect furry travel companions.
  • They are prone to several systemic illnesses that are common among the parent breeds, so you need to find a good vet to keep their health in check.
  • Their inquisitiveness knows no bounds, so get used to submitting daily reports to your dog-inspector about where you were and what on earth you smell like today!

The Dachshund Pomeranian Mix: The Doxie Pom

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  • Doxie Poms are superb family pooches — they are kind and gentle, and they love being surrounded by people.
  • They’ll fit into the smallest of living spaces, so you don’t have to worry about matching this dog to the size of your home — they’ll love it whatever it’s like.
  • Dachshund Pomeranians need a bit more grooming than most Dachshund mixes due to their luscious coat and its propensity for shedding.
  • They can be somewhat clingy, and they are happiest with owners who’ve got time to spare, work from home, or have a big family that they can be around 24/7.

Dachshund Husky Mix: The Dusky

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  • A Dachshund Husky mix will thrive in households with other dogs, but they may get in hunter-mode if you have other animals, such as hamsters or parrots.
  • They tend to get aggressive if you don’t have a firm hand and train the tail out of them, so they may not be the best fit for inexperienced owners.
  • Although they usually have a long coat, they need moderate but consistent grooming.

The Dachshund Maltese Mix: The Mauxie

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  • Mauxies are adorably mischievous — they’ll sniff your bag and coat every time you walk through the door and will ask tons of yappy questions about where you’ve been, who you’ve seen… Prepare for a little fuzzy interrogator if you adopt this breed.
  • They’ll boss you around if you let them. The formula is this: training with perseverance and patience = a perfect, well-behaved pooch.
  • They are people-loving munchkins that are only satisfied when they are around their human family.
  • Their coat sheds and gets dirty a lot, so know you’ll have to bathe and brush them often.

Dachshund Dalmatian Mix: The Dalmachshund

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  • When it comes to the Dachshund Dalmatian mix, the chances are this pooch will be a highly active one. Doxies are definitely lively, but Dalmatians take the win on that front, so their offspring won’t be much different.
  • They have a genetic predisposition to deafness and intervertebral disk disease and will require regular visits to the vet to make sure everything is in order with their health.
  • Dalmatians shed like crazy, although you would never have guessed it by their sleek, short hair. If your pooch is genetically more like their Dachs parent, grooming will be much easier for both you and your doggorino.

Dachshund Australian Shepherd Mix: The Auxie Doxie

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  • Aussie Doxies have inexhaustible energy and need an owner who can keep up with their activity needs.
  • These pooches are large and energetic, so they need to have their space and won’t be happy in tiny apartments.
  • They are affectionate and loyal, which makes them fantastic additions to any family.
  • You’ll need to invest in plenty of equipment to keep their lush coat spiffy.

Dachshund Border Collie Mix: The Dollie

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  • Border Collie Dachshunds are not bred to lie around and should not be allowed to get bored under any circumstances. If they do, they may turn destructive and take their frustration on your chic furniture.
  • Unlike their bold Dachshund parent, these pooches are rather shy, especially in front of strangers. Make sure to socialize them from the first weeks of their life to get rid of their timid streak.
  • They have lots of energy and love being outdoors, playing catch, fetch, hide-and-seek, and befriending other dogs from the hood.

Dachshund Rottweiler Mix: The Dachsweiler

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  • Dachshund Rottweiler Mix doggos have broad chests, which should give you a hint at how active and energetic they are.
  • The good news is that they are super low-maintenance woofers and only require occasional grooming.
  • They may look angry and dangerous, but these “tough-guys” love goofing around and playing with your little ones.

Dachshund Doberman Mix: The Doxie Dobie

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  • Doxie Dobies need an invested owner. Exercise them daily and schedule regular visits to the pet clinic to check their overall health. Both Doxies and Dobies are prone to certain conditions that get passed on to their mixed offspring.
  • Their temperament is certainly something to write home about. They are loyal and affectionate, protective and alert, playful and cuddly — all in one cute little package!
  • Although they are typically shorthaired stunners, they shed significantly. You will need to brush them weekly in low-shedding seasons and daily in high-shedding periods.

They Dachshund Papillon Mix: The Papshund

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  • Papillon Dachshunds are usually nothing like their Dachshund parent — they are a dream to train and have a luxurious-looking coat reminiscent of their Papillon mom or dad.
  • They are prone to separation anxiety if you neglect them often and obesity if you don’t exercise them adequately. Luckily, they have moderate activity needs that most owners would adapt easily to.
  • Their coat may need daily brushing to keep unsightly tangles at bay, but the good news is that they don’t shed a lot.

Rat Terrier Dachshund Mix: The Rat Doxie

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  • Rat Terrier Dachshund doggos are super easy to keep — they need minimal grooming and don’t require a lot of space. They will demand your undivided attention, though, but what’s not to love about that?
  • Provided you don’t have toddlers wobbling around and bothering this snappy pup, you likely won’t be able to tell that they have an aggressive bone in their body.
  • They have the short temper characteristic of small dog breeds, but they are loyal to the bone.

Dachshund Italian Greyhound Mix: Le Doxie Italiano

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  • The Italian Greyhound Doxie mix is an amazing companion dog — they’ll follow you everywhere and relish taking part in whatever you do.
  • They are prone to separation anxiety if you neglect them.
  • Owing to their strong inborn prey drive, they can get aggressive towards little animals, which won’t bode well if you have other non-canine pets in your home.
  • They are low-maintenance puppers, so you’ll be able to get away with minimal grooming.

Bulldog Dachshund Mix: The Bulldach

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  • Bulldog Dachshunds‘ temperament will undoubtedly surprise you. Bulldogs were bred to be the tough guys in the canine world — aggressive and tenacious enough to make the enormous, mighty bulls do their bidding — but over time, they turned into the cuddliest and most affectionate companion doggos. The same applies to their mixed pooches.
  • If you’re a newbie dog owner, these beasties are ideal for you — they require minimal grooming, don’t like to exercise much, and love to lounge next to their humans.
  • But beware — if you leave them alone for too long and too often, they will probably suffer from separation anxiety.

Blue Heeler Dachshund Mix: The Blue Doxie

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  • Blue Heeler Dachshunds are no fuss in terms of grooming, so you’ll need to put in minimal effort to keep them nice and clean.
  • These pooches are so active and filled with energy that they’ll drag you out to exercise, too!
  • Unlike most small and medium-sized pups, these don’t have a problem with being alone — they love their own company.

Boxer Dachshund Mix: The Doxie Boxie

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  • Dachshund Boxers will do their utmost to terrorize any small animals that you have in your home, which means they are not the best choice for families with multiple pets.
  • They are splendid guard dogs by nature but will need early socialization to prevent this trait from turning into aggression toward every visitor you have.
  • Grooming is a breeze with these pooches, but you’ll need to get used to the fact that they drool quite a lot.

French Bulldog Dachshund Mix: The French Bull Wiener

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  • Dachshund French Bulldog mix woofers are easy to keep and need minimal activity, so they are a great fit for busy owners.
  • These adorable short-snouts are super friendly to other pets and will have loads of fun with your other canines, as well as cats.
  • They will also thrive in a household with numerous occupants because they love being around humans, too.

Pekingese Dachshund Mix: The Pekehund

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  • Dachshund Pekingese crossbreeds are an ideal breed for small apartment dwellers.
  • They are super easy to take care of — a simple routine is all they need to be neat and tidy.
  • They love and are loyal to their humans to the bone, but they don’t have much patience for small children, which is an essential thing to keep in mind before getting this fluffer.

Dachshund Boston Terrier Mix: The Bo-Dach

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  • Boston Terrier Dachshund mixes are terrific family dogs, and they love toddlers and small kids.
  • If minimal grooming and a lot of affection are what you’re looking for in a furry companion, a Bo-Dach could be the right pup for you.
  • This is one of the best city dog breeds — adaptable and small apartment-friendly.

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Dachshund Mix: The Dashalier

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  • Dashaliers get along with children and love being surrounded by people and showered with their affection, which is why they develop separation anxiety easily if neglected.
  • Cavalier Spaniels are among the most endearing puppers in the world, and their mixed offspring tends to inherit their mild temperament.
  • These pooches are stubborn and not easy to train, so you’ll need a firm hand and an unrelenting persistence that will match theirs.

Weimaraner Dachshund Mix: The Daimeraner

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  • Weimaraner Doxies love kids and visitors, and there’s nothing that makes them happier than when they are the center of everyone’s attention.
  • If you are in search of a jogging partner or a woofer to keep up with your outdoor activities, a Daimeraner is an ideal fit for you.
  • These pooches are usually super easy to groom and are generally in good health.

Dachshund Bichon Mix: The Doxie-Chon

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  • Bichon Doxies will do well in most families (sans the small kiddos), and they are an amazing fit for seniors, too.
  • They don’t like working out and will be perfectly happy just lounging around in front of the telly.
  • Grooming them will require weekly brushing and several visits to the dog parlor a year.

Dachshund Pitbull: The Dox-Bull

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  • Although they look tough and ready to attack at any given moment, Dachshund Pitbull woofers are incredibly affectionate towards their human family.
  • They are loyal pooches but can sometimes get overly protective of their owners, which may cause them to be aggressive. This probably won’t happen if you socialize them properly.
  • If you decide to get a Pit-Dachs, you’ll need ample patience and determination to train them, as they are known to be rather resistant to it.

Dachshund Mix Health Concerns

Now that you’ve found the perfect Doxie mix for you, we need to get to work and tell you all about keeping them happy and healthy.

If you’ve browsed through our essential Dachshund facts, you know that all Doxie crossbreeds live quite a long time, so you need to be ready to commit long-term. Many exciting things can happen during a Dachshund’s lifespan, so you need to make sure you can keep up.

First of all, you need to train your Wiener and to make sure they are properly housebroken and potty trained. To keep your pooch’s mane tamed, you’ll need to learn how to groom them properly, so do refer to our Dachshund care tips.

Mixed doggos tend to be healthier than purebred pups, but there is still a possibility that your hybrid charmer will inherit a health concern or two from their moms and pops. Prepare yourself ahead of time and get familiar with the Dachshund health issues, their prevalent back problems, seizures, and skin conditions. If you happen to have any questions, refer to our comprehensive guides on Doxie mixes above — and always consult with a veterinarian!

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