Stop Hugging Your Dog! New Study Suggests….

You may be unknowingly stressing your dog out when you hug them. A recent study suggests…

According to Psychology Today Stanley Coren PhD., DSc, FRSC

“Dogs are technically cursorial animals, which is a term that indicates that they are designed for swift running. That implies that in times of stress or threat the first line of defense that a dog uses is not his teeth, but rather his ability to run away. Behaviorists believe that depriving a dog of that course of action by immobilizing him with a hug can increase his stress level and, if the dog’s anxiety becomes significantly intense, he may bite. For that reason, certain websites, which try to educate children and parents in order to reduce the incidence of dog bites (such as Doggone Safe), make a point about teaching children that they should not hug dogs. Furthermore, a few years back when a children’s book entitled “Smooch Your Pooch” recommended that kids hug and kiss their dog anytime and anywhere, the American Veterinary Society of Animal Behavior (AVSAB) felt that it was necessary for them to release an official statement that strongly advised parents to avoid purchasing the book, since this information can cause children to be bitten.”


Coren continued to explain how searching for images of dog’s being hugged further established his theory…

“Fortunately for me, the Internet abounds with photographs of people and their pets. If you put the search terms “hug dog” or “love dog” into something like Google Image Search, or Flickr, you will get a virtually infinite scroll of pictures of people and their children hugging their pet dogs. I decided to look at a random sample of 250 such pictures. I used a variety of criteria to try to keep the data as clean and precise as possible. I only used photos where the dog’s face was clearly visible. I also eliminated situations where one might expect the dog’s stress level to rise because of factors other than being hugged (such as when someone lifts a large dog off the ground while hugging them). Each picture received one of three possible scores:”

  1. One could judge that the dog was showing one or more signs of stress or anxiety;
  2. One could judge that the dog appeared to be relaxed and at ease;
  3. One could decide that the dog’s response was ambiguous or neutral.

“I can summarize the data quite simply by saying that the results indicated that the Internet contains many pictures of happy people hugging what appear to be unhappy dogs. In all, 81.6% of the photographs researchers scored showed dogs who were giving off at least one sign of discomfort, stress, or anxiety. Only 7.6% of the photographs could rate as showing dogs that were comfortable with being hugged. The remaining 10.8% of the dogs either were showing neutral or ambiguous responses to this form of physical contact.”


Here are a couple examples of dogs showing signs of stress while being hugged.

Obviously some dog owners are a little upset over the study….

I’m not going to lie… I hug my dogs daily! I hug them when I wake up and when I go to bed. I’ve never noticed my dog being stressed out when I show them some lovin’. The hugs usually end up with a couple wet kisses to my face and them slowly rolling onto their back for a belly rub. I’m going to continue hugging my dogs daily…

WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS ON THE STUDY. ARE YOU STILL GOING TO CONTINUE HUGGING YOUR DOG?